Advertisement

People

/

Profiles

An Interview with Yoshikazu Adachi

The President and CEO of Nomura Securities Malaysia shares the benefits of TalentCorp’s Residence Pass–Talent, life in Malaysia compared to Japan, and Malaysia as a destination.

by / Published: 11 Sep 2013

An Interview with Yoshikazu Adachi

Content sponsored by TalentCorp

The President and CEO of Nomura Securities Malaysia, Yoshikazu Adachi talks about the possibilities that come with TalentCorp’s Residence Pass–Talent, how different it is living in Malaysia compared to Japan and Malaysia as a destination.

Arriving in Malaysia
I was assigned to Malaysia in July 2009, so it has been four years now. After I graduated from university in 1988, I was in Tokyo for three years (working for Nomura Securities), then I was in Bahrain and Hong Kong for five years respectively, back in Tokyo, then London and now I am based in Malaysia.

Life with the Residence Pass–Talent
TalentCorp acts proactively in order to promote business, which differentiates it from the one in other countries. By holding the RP–T, I would say that I can be more committed to Malaysia now. Among the business people, if they happen to know that I am an RP–T holder, they will welcome me as a member of their society and not just a visiting foreigner, which helps my business a lot. It also makes me sometimes feel like a part of the local society.

In the future, of course, it will be possible for my wife to look for a job if she wants to; also, my parents-in-law may be able to reside here if they decide to leave Japan because it is a complimentary pass for them as well.

Mutual respect between cultures
I happen to find that Malaysians in general have a similar mentality to the Japanese. As you know, we live on an island and about 70 percent of the land areas are mostly uncultivated, which means that over 130 million people are living on just 30 percent of natural land, which may contribute to our mentality of caring for each other. Malaysians have a similar mentality to look out for one another—you are multiracial, so you have to be accommodating to each other, and you respect each other’s religions and customs—so it provides us with a comfortable atmosphere when we live here. I think Malaysia is one of the countries that favours Japan, our people and our culture, which makes us feel very comfortable here.

One of the most typical differences is that Malaysia is a Muslim country, so Muslim customs are observed everywhere and we respect that. Another thing is that Malaysia is a multicultural and multiracial country, so that is quite different from Japan—we have to be more considerate towards others compared to before.

Among the memorable experiences I have had in Malaysia is when Nomura invited Tun Dr Mahathir to Japan last year, and organised a symposium in order to celebrate the 30th anniversary of the Look East Policy, where the former Prime Minister gave a commemorative speech.

Malaysia as a destination
As a living destination, Malaysia is a really nice place; I really recommend it as one of the best destinations to stay, especially for Asians. People here are warm hearted, well educated and in general very polite, except for the motorcyclists (laughs). One of the most important things, at least for me, is the cuisines. I can choose from Malay, Chinese, Indian to Western, Japanese and Korean cuisines, and it’s all here. The quality of the food here, even the street food, is quite good. I will borrow the word used by your Prime Minister—as a package, Malaysia is one of the best destinations.


Got a question for TalentCorp Malaysia? Send it to info@talentcorp.com.my for more advice, or visit www.talentcorp.com.my.
 

Advertisement

MORE STORIES

Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement
Advertisement